Posts Tagged ‘Beekeeping’

Transforming children’s mind from bee hating to bee loving for Development

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We managed to capture the queen bee and removed her wings so to prevent her from flying away. We successfully transferred the colony into a bee hive so the family can continue to harvest honey plus other bee product.

This is what you need to know to prevent bees from stinging you: First, you need to calm them down by smoking. If you are going to be transferring the bees into an hive, then you need to capture the queen and remove her wings so she can not fly. If you don’t remove her wings, you can enclose her in a cage with holes where she can be fed but not able to get out immediately (the worker bee will be able to open a passage for her to get out after some days). Then the rest of the bees will just come to protect the queen. Also, when a bee moves on you, just leave it and don’t kill it. If you kill it then other bees will smell a certain scent and they will begin to sting you. Also, you don’t have to run but just walk gently and don’t wear perfume. Always smoke yourself and try to smoke around.

Do you have a problem with bees? Just drop us a line and we shall be right there. Thank you

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100 Bee Hives constructed by KIRUCODO Staffs for Empower and Care Organization

Some of the 100 constructed hives already  up ready to be colonized by bees

Some of the 100 constructed hives already up ready to be colonized by bees

This month of July 2014, Kikandwa Rural Communities Development Organization (KIRUCODO) staffs were employed by an NGO (Empower And Care Organization – EACO ) based in Mukono on Kayunga road, YMCA Lane in Mukono town, Mukono District-Uganda to construct 100 Bee Hives for Namanganga Community  based in Kyampisi Sub-County, Mukono District-Uganda for more information please follow this LINK: With the utilization of CTA beekeeping publicationsTools With A Mission andWork Aid International donated carpentry tool, KIRUCODO staffs have been able to execute the job within a two-weeks period. A Big THANK YOU to all our supporters for providing us with appropriate tools, materials, skills and financial support which are enabling us to deliver to our target communities with much ease than it used to be. For more information about EACO please you can contact them directly through this email or this alternative email or visit their website

Below is a photo slideshow of what happened during a two-weeks period.

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Report on Funds Raised from 2012 Summer Global Giving Fundraising Drive for SUPPORT US TO SEND BEES TO WORK AS WE KEEP LOCAL FARMERS’ CHILDREN IN CLASS THAN MAKING THEM (CHILDREN) WORK AS THEY MISS THEIR CLASSES

Hives Constructed with Funds Raise on Global Giving Platform

Hives Constructed with Funds Raise on Global Giving Platform

The slogan SUPPORT US TO SEND BEES TO WORK AS WE KEEP LOCAL FARMERS’ CHILDREN IN CLASS THAN MAKING THEM (CHILDREN) WORK AS THEY MISS THEIR CLASSES was used for the Global Giving Fundraising Drive aimed at raising funds to donate 250 beehives and basic beekeeping materials to 50 selected local farmers with children in Primary schools in and around Kikandwa villages in order to help establish Commercial Micro Beekeeping Enterprises (CMBE) so to be able to meet the educational needs of their children as well as training them in practical beekeeping for self sustenance (http://wp.me/pHagH-cw)

For all photos please visit our Organization facebook photo album  Continue reading

SUPPORT US TO SEND BEES TO WORK AS WE KEEP LOCAL FARMERS’ CHILDREN IN CLASS THAN MAKING THEM (CHILDREN) WORK AS THEY MISS THEIR CLASSES.

KIRUCODO Bees

KIRUCODO Bees during harvesting

Dear friends and partners,

Kikandwa Rural Communities Development Organization (KIRUCODO) wishes to inform you that its beekeeping project was approved for the 2012 September Global Giving online fundraising drive 

If supported, the projects will donate 250 beehives and basic beekeeping materials to 50 selected local farmers with children in Primary schools in and around Kikandwa villages.

The hives and materials will help to establish Commercial Micro Beekeeping Enterprises (CMBE) for local farmers in order for them to be able to meet the educational needs of their children as well as training them in practical beekeeping for self sustenance.

This communication is to call on your support in contributing and circulating this information updates to those in your respective networks for possible support. Here is a short link to the Project on the Global Giving network http://goto.gg/11203

We always Treasure your Efforts, Contributions and Support to our Organization’s projects.

SUPPORT US TO SEND BEES TO WORK AS WE KEEP LOCAL FARMERS’ CHILDREN IN CLASS THAN MAKING THEM (CHILDREN) WORK AS THEY MISS THEIR CLASSES.

Be blessed

Robert for KIRUCODO Management

P.S: A Global Giving Button for the project has also been fixed at our Organization homepage and Blog

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Beekeeping – a bright perspective for Uganda’s poor farmers

Community BeekeepersAlmost half of Uganda’s population lives below the poverty line. At the same time, nearly 90% of it activates and earns its income from agriculture. Thus it becomes obvious that farming is not profitable in this country, at least not for the moment. Women and children have an especially difficult life, because of the strong social polarization of the society. The overall development level in the region is far below the western standards, and catching up with them would require intense funding. This rule has some exceptions, however, such as beekeeping.

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Specialists in the industry made their own research and came to the conclusion that beekeeping has the potential to significantly reduce poverty among communities of young farmers best on the current testimonies and with the implementation of a long-term professional beekeeping industry strategic plan. Let’s shortly analyze the arguments for that:
1. Resources
Uganda is lucky to have many species of bees: Apis Melifera scutelatta, melifera adansonii, monticola, and also several types of stingless bees. In contrast with other agricultural areas, where Uganda has poor natural conditions for further development, the apiculture can grow fast and steady thanks to the rich availability of resources. Moreover, there are no diseases spread among the bees.

2. Long tradition and skills existence
Local people have been practicing apiculture for a very long time. They therefore have basic knowledge and understanding of the process and its importance. Instead of teaching this industry from the very beginning, it is only necessary to provide some further training, and implement a professional beekeeping concept which is based on the real standard governing this organic industry.

3. Limited technological requirements
Beekeeping can be implemented without the use of expensive technologies or materials. This provides a great perspective for the poor rural farmer, who cannot afford to invest too much in a business. Simple hives, created from cheap locally abundant materials could be placed close to the farmer’s house, therefore not requiring too much effort or budgeting. Special training could teach the farmers how to improve the quality of bee products without using expensive tools. This would obviously allow a significant increase of the locals’ income.

4. Possibility of activity without owning land
Since young farmers do not typically own land, one of their main problems is the increased costs of agricultural activities due to the land rent. Beekeeping in contrast, does not require this. It can be arranged either close to the house, or even in forests. In other words, this type of activity is much more accessible for young poor farmers than other areas of agriculture.

Of course, there are also many limitations and barriers for the development of apiculture in Uganda. As long as we keep in mind the benefits, however, it is possible to develop a flourishing industry out of this and let young farmers develop themselves and overcome the severe poverty. All they need is a bit of support in the form of extended training, as well as access to information and initial financial support.

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