Archive for the ‘Agriculture’ Category

Rotate Roosters for higher fertilized egg percentage

If you are in business of hatching eggs, make sure you have enough Roosters which you can keep on rotating. You can see, these roosters in the photo were removed and kept in holding rooms for a day and other roosters were introduced. So, we keep on rotating roosters to make sure that we have a good percentage of fertilized eggs which result into a good percentage of chicks on hatching. Remember, each rooster serves 8 hens (according to our research) but books say one rooster per 10 hens.

Why we feed our Kuroiler Birds of Grass

Feed Savings

Forages can provide a significant amount of poultry nutrition, reducing the amount of feed that a poultry farmer feeds a flock. Although poultry are not ruminants – they’re monogastric – a good pasture is still a valuable resource for the flock. Pastured poultry eat five to 20 per cent [of their diet] from pasture, depending on type and age of poultry, and the quality of forage growth”.

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Harvesting our Organically grown backyard tomatoes

We have started to harvest our tomatoes as you can see in the attached photos. One thing you need to always remember with organic backyard tomato growing in sacks is, to be able to make your own composite manure as we explained earlier in this video https://youtu.be/Y3XsEibkfCw . Having access to composite manure will help you to easily enrich your soil which is used every now and then. Again, I encourage to keep some chicken at home which can be a good source for material you need to make composite manure. Thank you

Our Kuroiler Chicken parent stock is developing well

Our parent stock is developing well and this is the feed formula we use at this stage: In100Kg of Maize Bran, add: 12Kg of Fish (silver fish), 12Kg of Cotton cake, 12Kg of Lime or Shells, 0.5Kg of General Premix, 0.5Kg of Salt, 0.5Kg of Toxic Binder, NOTE: -You can add 20Kg of Broken maize if there no enough granules in the maize bran. Always remember to add toxic binder to get lead of any pathogens which might be dangerous to your birds.

HOW TO EASILY AND CHEAPLY IRRIGATE YOUR BACKYARD CROPS DURING A DRY SEASON?

Flipped upside down plastic bottle filled with water

During hot seasons, it’s important that we keep ourselves and our plants well hydrated. In the heat and sun, our bodies perspire to cool us down, and plants transpire in the midday heat too. Just as we rely on our water bottles throughout the day, plants can benefit from a slow-release watering system as well.

Fill your bottle to the top with water. Then flip the bottle upside down and bury it about two inches into the soil. As the soil dries out from your last watering, fluid will slowly drip from the bottle into your soil, ensuring that your plant receives just the moisture it needs to thrive. It is amazing but, the plant consumes very little water a day and that 1L plastic bottle can serve a crop for a number of days during the week.

What a season! Desert Locusts, COVID-19, Army-warm, Floods, Hot season, etc

Good-1Off our very busy schedule, we take time to fight army-warm. We are engaged on many fronts this season; Desert Locusts, COVID-19, Army-warm, Floods, Hot season, etc. Man keeps on struggling for life and we pray for His coming back to take us where there is no sweat for Food.
Keep looking in the skys but as you work and performing His Righteousness because we don’t know the time and hour He will be coming back.

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Home-Based Garbage Management for Supporting Backyard Gardening

Introduction

very-good-3Households in urban places here in Uganda accumulate much garbage on a daily basis. City, Municipality, and Town councils don’t have the capacity to collect, sort and process garbage into monetary products for sustainable development.

My project, involves sorting and decomposing garbage at household level for enriching soils to support backyard gardening. Continue reading

Home Gardening for ensuring food security in our homes

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We used to plant flowers on our compound not knowing that the same space can be utilized to plant some food for the family. We now have 15 banana plants on our compound and each plant is able to provide us with 5 bunches a year. With 15 plants, we are able to harvest 75 bunches of banana a year. Each bunch serves our family for 3 days and 75 bunches  serves us a total of 225 days.

We have enough food on our compound. Never waste the free space around your house. Anything can grow there and be of great benefit to your family. #HomeGardening

Impact of youths rural-urban migration on the agricultural sector in Uganda and policy reforms.

GoodThis paper was presented by Mr. Robert Kibaya (KIRUCODO Executive Director) during the Agricultural Research for Development Conference (Agri4D 2019) conference in Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; 25-26 September, 2019 under Food security and migration governance Thematic Sub session.DSC02926 Continue reading

Request to respond to this survey: Impact of youths rural-urban migration on the agricultural sector

To respond to the survey, visit up this Link: https://bit.ly/2mgCWSm

IMG_20181221_085708Evidence has shown that majority of the population in most rural areas in Africa are small scale farmers providing food for human consumption and raw materials for export and manufacturing industries. Nearly two thirds (64%) of the working population engaged in subsistence agriculture and close to 80% of all households involved in agriculture. Statistics also indicates that more rural households participate in agriculture at 90% compared to their urban counterparts at 46%. The number of young migrants increased from 23.2 million in 1990 to 28.2 million in 2013 (UNICEF, 2014). According to FAO’s 2016 conceptual framework on addressing rural youth migration at its root causes at household level, young members may move to work elsewhere as part of the household’s risk diversification strategy but also in response to the household’s expectation of higher returns in the future or to personal aspirations.

This survey aims at collecting views from different stakeholders/ individuals around the world on why youths rural-urban migration and its impact on agriculture.

The survey results will be utilized by Kikandwa Rural Communities Development Organization (KIRUCODO), Youths In Technology and Development Uganda (YITEDEV) and partners to develop informed interventions aiming at attracting more youths into the Agricultural sector for poverty eradication. Follow this link (https://bit.ly/2mgCWSm) to respond to the survey.

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